Built with Microsoft FrontPage Express & Xara Webstyle       Webmaster  rebelmc         Best viewed 1024x768


Glen Sanders

1,  WHEN DID YOU  FIRST RACE AND WHAT AGE ? 34

2, WERE DID  YOU FIRST RACE AND HOW DID YOU GET ON ? Taunton ( Smeatharpe)  no damage which was a bonus

3, IS ANY OF YOUR FAMILY IN TO RACING  IF SO CAN YOU  TELL US A BIT ABOUT IT my dad ralph been racing for over 30 years national hotrods may be one day he will give me a car lol

4,DO YOU BUILD YOUR OWN CAR / ENGINE built my first car and engine. then after 5 meetings brought a second hand lyndale race engine

5 WHAT YOUR BEST AND WORST MOMENT IN RACING SO FAR my best moment was winning a outlaw hotrod race which i beat my dad in. there has been 2 first was at Hednesford european Championship went on oil got collected by my good friend john O'Donnavan then at Northampton got turned and rob Mc Donald hit me head on that hurt.
 

6,WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST RACE CAR Vauxhall Nova

 
7, WHAT  DO YOU THINK OF RULES IN STOCK ROD AND WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE ANY THINK NEW COME IN new rules i think they have taken it a bit far!! there should be a limit on what's spent it meant to be budget racing

8,HAVE YOU RACED ANY OTHER FORMULAS race a season at Mendips in a out law hotrod

9, WHO DO YOU THINK THE MOST COMPETITIVE DRIVERS there's so many but a few that come to mind are Sturty, Smyth, Mc Donald, Carter and Troffer the list goes on

10,WHAT YOUR FAVOURITE / WORST TRACK AND WAY fav track Hednesford, really haven't got a worst track just love to race!

11, WHAT SPONSORS WOULD YOU LIKE TO THANK Autodump aerial south west, STR logistics, oh and myself sanders digital aerials and a big thank you to mike Loosemore Motorside Ltd 

12 DO YOU FAMILY SUPPORT YOU IN RACING yes they do 

13, ARE  YOU PLANNING ON STAYING IN STOCK RODs OR MOVE ON TO HOT  ROD OR SOME OTHER FORMULAS will be staying for the for see able future I want to become competitive

  
MANY THANKS FOR YOU  TAKING TIME  TO  DO THIS  FOR ME  AND LIKE TO WISH YOU BEST OF LUCK FOR THE COMING YEAR 
JANE CARTER 

 

NAME? Danny Hunn
AGE? .28

 
RACE NUMBER?  39
 
WHAT MADE YOU START RACING  & WHEN? Been going racing since I was only 2 weeks old

WAS YOU’RE FIRST RACE IN A STOCK ROD, IF NOT STILL TELL US ABOUT IT?  First raced ministox for spedeworth but only done a few meetings, then did Arena Essex 1300 stock cars, Group a Hot Rods then the start of 2010 decided to do Stock Rods.

 
HAVE ANY OF YOUR FAMILY RACED IF SO WHEN and WHERE? Dad Ricky Bangers Group a Hot rods, Polley Rods, National Hot Rods, Eurocars and Pickups
Brother Jason Group a Hot Rods, Nationals, Eurocars, Ricky jnr Group a Hot Rods, 1300 Stock Cars and Stock Rods, Terry Outlaw Hot Rods then Nationals, Sister Nicky Group a Hot Rods
 WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST STOCK ROD? Vauxhall Nova
 
AT WHAT AGE DID YOU START RACING? 11
 
DO YOU BUILD YOUR OWN STOCK RODS? IF NOT WHO? Gunner built car and FG Fabrication car, repairs carried out by Tony Barnes and David Philip
 
 DO YOU BUILD YOUR OWN ENGINE? IF NOT WHO?  FGS Engine and JB Race Engines
 
WHAT WAS YOUR BEST/WORST MOMENT IN STOCK RODS? None to date
.
WHAT DRIVERS DO YOU THINK ARE MOST COMPETITIVE? David Philip jnr, McDonald, Smyth, Sturty, Fox
 
WHAT DRIVER DO YOU THINK WOULD HELP ANY ONE? David Philip jnr, Smyth, Sturty, Taylor
 
WHAT YOUR FAVOURITE TRACK AND WHY? Probably have to be Tipperary practicing dads national hot rod
 
 WHAT YOUR WORST TRACK AND WHY? Ipswich never seam to have any luck there.
 
Many thanks for taking the time Jane Carter.
 

Interview with 2009 World Champion #829 Stuart Fox

JC: - I have to start by saying well done on winning the World Championship, did you ever think this would have happened for you?

SF: - No to be honest. I suppose that every racer hopes that one day they would win the world but never actually thinks it will happen.

JC: - Can you tell me how the race went for you?

SF: - I was very lucky to qualify on pole after the time trials in the afternoon, especially after the rain came just before the first session of qualifying. I thought it would turn the world grid into a total lottery positions. I knew that in the wet we wouldn’t be quick enough. I couldn’t make my mind up whether to go out in the wet at the start of qualifying or wait until the last group and see if the track dried to give me a bit of an edge. In the end I decided to go out in the second group, which put me out half way through both sessions so I tried to get the best of both scenarios. As we started the rolling lap and got green I got away well but when the race was stopped within the first lap because of a pile-up it didn’t help my nerves when a complete restart was needed. If anything I thought my second start was better which is surprising for me as I am not the best off the mark. Davy Philp pushed me for the first few laps but as the race settled down I started to pull away until I came upto a couple of back markers and the next thing I knew he was back on my bumper. We both managed to get through the back markers, then the yellow flags came out. With no back markers in between us now, faint memories of 2 years ago began to creep back into my mind, I knew I couldn’t let him get up my inside. He would have to go the long way round if he wanted to pass me. At the green he did make a better start than me and we went under the flag we were side-by-side. Luckily for me I had a good run around the turnstile bend down the back straight and managed to stay infront. I put my head down and concentrated on staying smooth and began to pull away again. By this time the lap boards couldn’t come out quick enough but the best part of it was I missed the first couple of lap boards and the next thing I knew I was 1 lap to but I still kept the momentum going until I saw those chequered flags and then I knew I’d actually done it and finally I could relax.

JC: - There were rumours that your Peugeot was illegal now that it has passed would you like to comment on what was said

SF: - I understand that some people are sceptical about things which are different. And they don’t like things away from the norm. However, I hope now that other drivers will realise that sometimes ‘different’ is not a bad thing providing it is done within the rules. I’ve always known that my car was legal and has to be because I try my best to attend every championship I can, funds permitting. So there is always a chance that my car can be stripped at any time.

JC: - Do you build your own cars?

SF: - yes. I build everything myself from shell down to the fuel tank. I do all the paintwork and bodywork. I do get help with the cosmetic side of the car from my mate Andy who runs AP signs along with his business partner Peter. He does all of my sign writing from design to the printing. His work is 1st class and always of a high quality and finishes the car off perfectly.

JC: - Do you build your own engines?

SF: - I do build all my own engines with my machining work being done by my close friend Alex, who along with Paul runs the company ‘Engine services & components’ which is based in Rosewell near Edinburgh.

JC: - Now you've won the big one will you be staying in Stock Rods?

SF: - Well apparently I am moving into National Hot Rods if the word on the grape vine and the commentator’s announcement at the world final, before I’d even qualified are to be believed.

Only time will tell… for now I’ll keep dreaming.

JC: - What else have you won?

1999 & 2007 English Championship.

2000 & 2007 INCARACE points Championship.

2004 & 2008 British Championship.

2009 Irish open Championship

JC: - What drivers do you rate and why?

SF: - All drivers deserve respect for the amount of work they put in. Relatively speaking stock car racing is no different from formula 1 GP for the effort involved in preparing a car to race all over the country week in and week out.

JC: - Now you have won in the Peugeot do you think that the Nova has had it's day or is there still life left in them?

SF: - I don’t think it matters what car you have got. It all comes down to the amount of time and effort, not just on the track bur behind the scenes in the garage as well where the races can be won or lost before even heading to the track. Just by the amount of Nova’s racing I think they will be around for many years to come. However, the ORCi needs to make sure that rules are kept updated to ensure that no matter what the car type is, they all have fair and even chances of wining races. 

JC: - Would you like to thank anyone for helping you over the years?

SF: - It would take to long to thank everybody but they all know who they are, for their help and support in getting me to the world final, let alone wining it. I do need to mention Alex, Paul and granddad at Engines services & components

(0131-440-0201), Andy & Peter at AP signs (07732538073) because without all their hard work and dedication none of this would be possible. I’d like to give a special thank you to Dave Patterson (Stock Rod 900) for getting my car to the world final in the 1st place by donating his lorry as a favour after my van was involved in an accident whilst I was over in Ireland defending the British Championship.

Many thanks to the 2009 Stock Rod World Champion for his time.

Jane Carter


UP AND COMING YOUNG DRIVER DEAN O DELL #171

Jc: Dean you have been having a few wins this last year which win sticks in your mind and why?

O'Dell  The one that sticks in my mind the most is the all comers race at Hednesford nationals weekend because the top stock rod drivers from all over the uk racing and to have won against them is a big achievement.

Jc: Can you give us a quick run down of when you first ever raced and where.

O'Dell  I first raced a ministock back in 1998 at rye house and I only done one lap all meeting before I got hit from the star drivers an it scared me so I kept pulling off lol.

Jc: All your family is in to racing dad and brother is your brother thinking of going in to stock rods. 

O'Dell He can not make his mind up at the moment one day he wants to do stock rods then the next its 1300cc stock cars then 2.0ltr stock cars. But he has still got another year left in minis so by then he might have made up his mind.

Jc: Which drivers do you find will always help you out at a meeting? 

O'Dell I find the most helpful drivers are Smyth, Carter and Sturty they have helped me out since I've bin in stock rods so a thank you to them for there help. But most of all the other drivers will always help out with some good information.

Jc: What drivers do you look up to {not just in stock rods?} 

O'Dell  I look up to my dad as he has done racing for so many years so his experience helps me out a lot.

Jc: Do you think you will be staying with stock rods or a bit or are you thinking of moving on, if so what next.

O'Dell  At the moment I am happy to stay with the stock rods. But I am always up for a challenge in another formula if the right sponsorships comes along.

Jc: Which drivers in stock rods do you feel put the most in to there racing.

O'Dell  The top guns because they would not be top if they did not put a lot of effort into their cars.

Jc: Will you be doing the worlds in 2009? 

O'Dell If I qualify I will be trying my best for a good finish but as long as I can enjoy myself and come out with a smile on my face I will b happy.

Jc: What engine do you run and who does all the work on your car. 

O'Dell  The Engine is built by Lyndale and have given me what I feel is a strong engine and am very grateful to them. But being on a budget it is just me and my dad who does the suspension and bodywork and a big mention must go to Copart for there support an help.

Jc: Do you think there is too much contact in stock rods if so what do you think we can do to stop this?

O'Dell  Some days there are loads of contact then others there isn’t I just think that people need to be more patient instead of thinking that racing is won on the first bend.

Jc: What is your ambition in stock rods?

O'Dell My ambition is to compete with the best from all over the country and to enjoy the good side of racing. 

 


SPEDEWORTH STAR MAN STUART SMYTH.

JC In 2008 you have won a few championships Can you name them all?

SS The English, Southern, National, European and points Championships


JC Out of the ones   you won this year which one meant the most and why.
?

SS The European because it’s the 2nd biggest championship in the orci


JC You didn’t make the worlds this year are you planning to in 2009.
?

SS I do hope to attend the worlds depending on were when and how much.


JC The World is the  one that keeps getting away from you do you think 2009 going to be the one.

SS I hope so but say the same every year


JC I Believe you have more than one car why is it you stay with your old?

SS Just Because I’m comfortable with it but I will race the others in 2009


JC Would you ever think of moving on to another formula or do you think stock rods still the best buzz for the money?

SS I really think I will stay with the stock rods. I like the fast close racing


JCWhat drivers in stock rods do you look up to and wh
y? 

SS All those that do the traveling at these hard times.


JC You are unpopular with some drivers what would you like to say to them?

SS I race to win not to please


JC Many drivers do look up to you and what tips could you give to any new driver that is just starting out?

SS Its time in the garage that wins races just keep at it don’t get disheartened


JC Spedeworth has got some good low graders is there any one that stands out to you to become a top driver?

SS There are a few but 171 Dean O’Dell stands out the most


JC There has been lots of talk about rules changes to make stock rods cheaper what’s your out look on this?

SS Leave them as they are it will cost everyone more money if the rules are changed


JC A lot of driver are saying the cost is down to contact  and  damage to cars what do you think can be done to help this?

SS Use there mirrors more stop blocking or driving into faster cars when around the outside or up the inside (give a line) cars are getting faster than drivers reaction times to be making silly mistakes


JC Do you think there is any other cars out there that could replace the Nova/Corsa if so what?

SS No not for easy with gear changing etc something will come along soon but don’t know what it will be


JC What do you think would help stock rods?

SS More drivers at domestic meetings.     


JC Any one you like to thank

SS All my Family sponsors and supporters (if there are any) Lol. They all know who they are.

 
Jane Carter


Interview with the now 3 time World Stock Rod Champion #9 Glen Bell

JC: Have to say a big well done Glen for winning the world yet again; after your second time of winning the world did you really think you would be doing for a third time?

GB: No I really didn’t. I struggled with the old car all season but wasn’t expecting the new car to be so much better.

JC: Glen can you give me a run down of the Stock Rod World final and your heats that eventually put you on poll for the world?

GB: I started inside second row for the first heat and was into 2nd behind Davy Phillip and I just wanted a good solid finish so I just stayed there. The second heat I started further back and to be honest I don’t remember much about it just remember going for a late 3 lap lunge around the outside and almost made it. I got 3rd but Barber got docked 2 places so that promoted me to 2nd which give me pole!

JC: Will you be in the line up for the Stock Rod World next year. As you have now equalled #77 Alan Connolly but there’s still one more you need to win to equal # 658 Gunner as he won it four times?

GB: No I really can’t see it with the National Hot Rod to race also. It’s too much money and time which we don’t have. But I still have another nova shell and you wouldn’t know I might just build it over the winter. To give that 4 timer a challenge!

JC: Who were you thinking that was going to pressure you into the first corner and what was the feeling when you were taking the final lap?

GB: For me it was Fox, MacAfee, Barber and McNiece. I knew all those boys would give me a run for it but when I went out in practice and seen Foxy struggle a bit so that helped to calm the nerves a small amount but I still knew he would have something better for the race! I remember coming around the last corner and seeing the chequered flag being held and once I crossed the line the butterflies arrived again in the stomach!

JC: In the three World titles you won which one do you feel was the hardest race and why?

GB: That’s a hard question, but I think it would have to be the first one because I was only 15 and the pressure I had to take on my shoulders and dropping back to third didn’t help things much. But at the same time none of them were easy!

JC: Has it been with the same car, engine, and so on or have you changed any thing?

GB: It’s been a new car, engine was the same and changed a few springs and that seemed to do it. I had to do something because I wasn’t going to win it if I didn’t; I wouldn’t even have a sniff at it!

 JC: Rumors have it that you are going to retire from Stock Rods does this mean Hot Rods full time for you?

 GB: Yes I have retired from them and the next step for me is to hopefully qualify for the world in the nationals next year. I wanted to retire on a high but to actually do it that is awesome!

JC: If you’re not to be in Worlds next year who do you put down for favorite to take the title?

GB:  It’s hard to say because I don’t know were its being held next year. Although it should be your usual contenders with the likes of Calvin Murray McDonald Smyth Sturty and Philip. And the list could go on and on that it’s such a competitive class.

JC: Who would you like to thank for all the help towards your winning?

GB I would like to thank my Dad, Mervyn McReyonlds and Brian Robinson also all the drivers that helped me out over the years and everyone who helped when I needed it or didn’t!

Jane Carter


Shane Murray

WHAT MADE YOU START RACING ?
 
My dad has been racing for probably over twenty years, and have been going to the racing since I was in nappies.  So was inevitable one day I would have an interest in racing myself.
 
WAS YOUR FIRST RACE IN STOCK RODS?
 
No, my first race was in a Junior Production at Portadown, when I was 13, only arrived in time for the final that night for my first race, which I won, was a good start, but next meeting done 2 laps before I hit the wall pretty hard. 
 
HAVE ANY OF YOUR FAMILY RACED IN THE PASSED?
 
Yes, My Dad John has been racing for probably over 20 years from National Hot Rods, Stock Rods and 2ltr Hot Rods which he currently still races. He was World Champion back in 2002 with the 2ltr Hot Rods and won most other major Championships in that class.
 
My brother Andrew also has been racing for a long time having raced National Hot Rods, 2ltr Hot Rods, Stock Rods and a brief spell in Formula 2's this season.  He is an ex-British Champion and has won quite a few other Championships.
 
So you can see I have alot to live up to.
 
WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST STOCK ROD?
 
My first Stock Rod was a Vauxhall Nova and an ex-Alan Connelly car which we bought from Ivan McMillan.
 
WHAT AGE DID YOU START RACING?
 
I started racing Junior Productions at the age of 13, where I started my rivalry with Glenn Bell, we came through Juniors together and into Stock Rods and have always been good friends. (off the track). I won the King of Nuttscorner and was twice Irish and Irish points Champion in the class.  I then started racing Stock Rods at the age of 15.
 
DO YOU BUILD YOUR OWN STOCK RODS?
 
Yes, the first car I had we bought, but the car I currently race we built ourselves, I also have a new car which I raced at Mallory Park was built by ourselves, all couldn't have been done without the help from my Dad and Brother, so I owe them alot of thanks.
 
DO YOU BUILD YOUR OWN ENGINES IF NO WHO DOES?
 
No, my engines are built by Trevor Hill.  Trevor has been extremely helpful to me, and his engines are second to none.  Would like to thank him for all his help.
 
HAVE YOU RACED IN ANY OTHER FORMULAS.
 
Junior Productions and currently racing a 2ltr Hot Rod, along with the Stock Rod.
 
WHAT'S THE BEST AND WORSE MOMENTS IN RACING. SO FAR FOR YOU
 
Well my worst moment has to be my first Spedeweekend where I was spun at the end of the straight pointing the wrong way, I was then hit head on, which hurt and done alot of damage to the car.
My best moment was probably winning the Yokohama Tyres Championship at Easter and recently winning the European Challenge recently ranks well up there.
 
 
WHAT DRIVER IN STOCK RODS DO YOU THINK WOULD HELP ANY ONE
 
I've found that if you're stuck for a part around the racing and you ask someone and they have it they will lend you it, or try to help you in some way.  Around the racing most are very helpful.

WHO DO THINK IS THE MOST COMPETIVE DRIVERS.
 
Well over here I find Glenn Bell and Alistair Calvin to be very competitive.  Across the water Robert McDonald, Stuart Fox, Smyth and Sturty are very competitive and the end of the day everyone wants to win.
 
WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE TRACK SO FAR?
 
Have a lot of tracks I really like, Cowdenbeath is probably one that compares to no other and has a brilliant atmosphere about it.  Ipswich, Hednesford and Tipperary are other tracks I like. 
 
WHAT IS YOUR WORST TRACK
 
Probably Ballymena, because I have rolled there twice, and seems to be the hardest track to get a Stock Rod to go well around.
 
WHAT IS YOUR AMBITION IN STOCK RODS
 
My ambition is to win a major title in the Stock Rods, preferably more that one!
 
WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THE STOCK ROD RULES SHOULD THEY STAY THE SAME OR IS THERE ANYTHING YOU LIKE TO SEE HAPPEN?
 
There are a few things I would like to change about the rules, but generally they are not far away.
 
ANYONE YOU WOULD LIKE TO THANK?
 
Would like to thank my Dad and Brother for all the help they have given me, and all the late nights in the shed.  Trevor Hill for all his help.  My sponsors Murray's of Randalstown, Derek McMillan Commercial vehicle refinishers, AMD Signs and Antrim Autoparts 
 

                          

    NAME? Leon Stewart

    AGE? 29 and old enough to know better.

    RACE NUMBER? 612.

    WHAT MADE YOU START RACING & WHEN? My dad (Kenny 216) raced saloonstox and sister (Kirsty 62) raced ministox so it was pretty much a sure thing that I would race one day.

    WAS YOU’RE FIRST RACE IN A STOCK ROD, IF NOT STILL TELL US ABOUT IT?

     My first outing was in a metro banger at a new year meeting in 1998 @ Cowdie, I was leading my first race with 2 laps to go before deciding that jacking another car would be more fun after that I raced Bangerstox before moving into Stock Rods.

    HAVE ANY OF YOUR FAMILY RACED IF SO WHEN and WHERE? Dad + sis as mentioned above we never knew of holidays abroad in my youth we spent it at Ippy+ Skegg who needs Ibiza?                       

   WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST STOCK ROD? AN EX-WULLIE BAULD (54) VAUXHALL NOVA.

   AT WHAT AGE DID YOU START RACING? 19yrs

   DO YOU BUILD YOUR OWN STOCK RODS? IF NOT WHO? We build our own with a little help for friends with the fabrication work

   DO YOU BUILD YOUR OWN ENGINE? IF NOT WHO? Currently Lyndale Engines.

   WHAT WAS YOUR BEST/WORST MOMENT IN STOCK RODS? Best so far was first final win in 2003, the worst is getting the 08 car written off in April which fractured my spine which will put me out for a year also having 3 months off work.

   WHAT DRIVERS DO YOU THINK ARE MOST COMPETITIVE? Everybody that races to win even those who say it’s just for fun.

  WHAT DRIVER DO YOU THINK WOULD HELP ANY ONE? I’ve never come across any drivers or crew who wouldn’t help or offer spares it’s something I believes is part and parcel of the sport.

  WHAT YOUR FAVOURITE TRACK AND WHY? Got to be Mallory Park it’s the speed!!!!!!!

  WHAT YOUR WORST TRACK AND WHY? No such thing as worst track I’ve got my favs but I’d rather race at a track I dislike than not race

  WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THE RULES IN STOCK RODS? I think a stronger implemtation of the rule book need to be enforced as some promotions are a bit lackluster with ensuring their own cars meet the ORC spec….the rule book is for everybody.

 

Many thanks for taking the time Jane Carter.

 


NEW COMER TO STOCK ROD GAVIN PIKE

WHAT MADE YOU START RACING AND WHEN?

I have always followed oval racing from a young age and have always felt the buzz at what ever track I have visited. I have always wanted to become involved from a young age I watched friends fathers in F2’s and then became involved in a large banger team where I travelled all over the country to various tracks. I have always also had a passion for road cars and had my fair share them spending god knows how much to make them faster and slicker !! I moved up to Scotland in 2007 and  met Leon Stewart  612 from GMP who I  tagged along with to various meetings at the racewall and Knockhill. I was inspired by his commitment to the formula along with his determination to always better himself. It was at this point that I really started to get the passion for stock rods and just wanted to get in and go. I moved back down  south and continued watching the likes of  Carter/Smyth and really thought I should get started in racing.

WAS YOUR FIRST RACE IN STOCK  RODS?

Jan 2008 at Wimbo

HAVE ANY OF YOUR FAMILY RACED IN THE PASSED?

Only my mum and dad racing around after me all the time lol !!

WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST CAR?

My first road car was an RS1600i   wwwooo hooo lol

WHEN DID YOU START RACING?

Jan 2008

WHAT AGE DID YOU START RACING?

27

DO YOU BUILD YOUR OWN STOCK RODS?

I purchased my current car from David Newall  601 

DO YOU BUILD YOUR OWN ENGINES IF NO WHO DOES?

I am currently having my new engine built at the moment but  as to who is building it  ??

You will have to come and speak nicely to me !!

HAVE YOU RACE IN ANY OTHER FORMULAS.

Had a go in the bangers before but nothing serious

WHAT'S THE BEST AND WORSE MOMENTS IN RACING. SO FAR FOR YOU

My best moment was getting 4th in my second ever race in the hail  my worst was getting it in the rear from MR C at wimbo

 

 WHAT DRIVER IN STOCK RODS DO YOU THINK WOULD HELP ANY ONE

I have to mention two people here  Leon Stewart  as he has helped so much and Mark Shinn jnr  (THANKS GUYS)

WHO DO THINK IS THE MOST COMPETIVE DRIVERS.

It’s hard to say as so many drivers out there as so good but from what I have seen  loads 

Smyth,Carter,Hardie,Bell,Mc Donald   the list goes on  !!

 

WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE TRACK SO FAR?

Go to be Bovi  for ma 4th place

WHAT IS YOUR WORST TRACK

Wimbo ooohhhh the posts

, WHAT IS YOUR AMBITION IN STOCK RODS

I would like to win the world  !!!!!   don’t we all

I just want to say a huge thanks to my family and friends for all the help guidance and support you have all given me in the past months I know I have been a pain in the rear but thanks I could not have done it with out you all.

A huge huge thanks to Leon Stewart 612 your like a brother to me your help and support are really appreciated thanks your one in a million. Mark Shinn Jnr  your such a great lad thanks for all your help m8 it’s nice to have someone to liase with who understands what’s it’s like starting out in this oval world. And finally Jane/Kim all the calls all the texts/Emails I really really appreciate your help/support and guidance your great people and I hope our racing relationship get stronger over the years to come !!!!


 Ad van Besouw
On 01-07-1984 there was the official European Championship in   Kaldenkirchen Germany. The winner was a friend of mine, Dutchman Ad van Besouw number car #16. All the top English drivers were present and he beat them all from a bad starting position. He was a top stock rod driver for many years, winning many Dutch and international points championships. He then bought an ex Antony van de Oetelaar superstock and was very successful in that too, also in England. A few months ago I found the cup in his garage.

 

 

I found two pictures of him in a NSU TT stock rod, but he won the European in a VW Polo. There are a lot of old stock rod pictures on a German website; fb-fotos.de. He did some races with the NSU TT in England (Great Yarmouth and Cleethorpes) as well, so there must be some photos on English websites.

 

 
This is Ad after winning in Belgium. The black/silver car in the back must be his but I am not 100% sure if it reads 16, but car has the same colours as his NSU´s have been. I think he had the silver, international (continental) points champion roof every year in stock rods and superstocks.  
He started racing stock rods from the introduction on the continent, when they had to tape the headlights (1977 I think). He got an uncompetitive superstock in around 1982/83 and went back to stock rods in 1984 in a VW polo with a Berrie van de Oetelaar build engine, which was very fast. After this he got a competitive ex Antony van de Oetelaar twice World championship winning superstock and was very successful with it, also in England.  

Sent in By Reinier Roosen


STEVEN WEEKS  #114

How did you get into racing?

Going to watch my dad on grass.

 Where was your first race?

Ringwood raceway.

 What was the cars like when you started?

Same as now really.

How old were you when you started racing and what were you racing?

13 in Ministox.

What are you racing now?

2ltr hot rod

What was your first car?

Nova.

Do you or have you ever built your own engines?

No to engine  I only built  my last car which was a Corsa and  done that one with the help of  with Richard Davis.

What was your best and moment in racing?

Winning Mallory in a nova that we did not finish until the day before and winning the European in Ireland when every one had said it was waste of time going as NO ONE ever wins in Ireland my worst moment was being taking out by back marker with four laps to go when defending the European in Ireland the following year .

In Stock Rods who do you think is/was the most competitive driver?

Stuart Smyth #47.

Has your family supported you throughout your racing career?

Yes Mum and Dad.

Is there ant sponsors that you would like to thank?

Mum @dad for the financial  support ACE engine for doing my engine  when I was in stock rods.

WHAT WAS YOUR BEST CAR?

All had there advantages  one was better in wet one I had was strong.

Do you have a favourite track?

Yes ..Ringwood Raceway /Hedenesford  and Ipswich .

What is your least favourite track?

Yarmouth.

Ambition in Stock Rods?

To be a top runner.

Jane Carter


INTERVIEW WITH WORLD CHAMP GLEN BELL  # 9

AFTER YOU WON THE WORLDS ONCE DID YOU EVER THINK YOU WOULD WIN IT AGAIN?

I was hoping to win it again but think I would have won it this year because there was a lot of quick Scottish guys and English!

WHO WAS THE MOST THREAT?

Stock Rods is a highly competitive class there will always be about 10 who will be a threat but Davy Phillip, Robert McDonald, Wully Hardie, Stuart Smyth, Foxy and Gunner would have been the main threats

CAN YOU GIVE ME A QUICK RUN DOWN OF HOW THE RACE WENT FOR YOU?

I was in third and Davy Phillip and I were racing for second when his driveshaft broke. There was 3 restarts and I just could do anything with foxy during the race then at the last restart I was sitting down the back straight and knew I had to make a good start and I just watched the lights once they went I went and got up the inside. The 3 lap board came out and the butterflies creped into my stomach and I was just trying to keep a steady race till the end.

WHAT  IS YOUR FUTURE IN RACING, ARE YOU PLANNING TO STAY WITH STOCK RODS OR MOVE ON TO HOT RODS?

I’m debating 2ltrs at the minute but I would like to do both but its time consuming and hard on money. I work in the garage 6 nights a week at the stock rod and if I had both I think the next option would be moving into the garage! I’m told it’s a good thing I’m not married!

AFTER YOU WON THE EUROPEAN THIS YEAR AND THERE WAS LOTS OF TALK ABOUT YOU VALVES WOULD YOU LIKE TO PUT YOUR SIDE ACROSS TO CLEAR THIS UP?

I’m glad this came up. They stripped the engine as per usual and they tried to say the valves were to short and the head was to small but they were getting the engine builder who’s cars was in 2nd and 3rd to compare them because the scrutiner  wasn’t sure. In my opinion he shouldn’t have been anywhere near my engine. My valve length was 100% legal but they said the head was to small which was rubbish then the rumours started!

HAVE YOU WON ANY OTHER MAJOR TITLES {NOT JUST IN STOCK RODS}?

I raced in juniors for a few years and won the Irish Championship in 2001 and Stadium Championship in 2001 when I went to the faithful nova!

                     

WHEN DID YOU FIRST RACE?

I was 11 and at shamrock park on the new days meeting!

HAVE YOU ANY FAMILY IN TO RACING?

My dad raced stock saloons for a 10 years and then went to 1600 hot rods for a year then he finished the racing and done a few derbys.

WHAT MADE YOU GET IN TO RACING?

My dad and I was always a motor head from no age 

BEST AND WORST MOMENTS?

Best moments is always winning any championship but this years world final especially to win it away from home. Worst would have been 2005 when I had such a bad weekend at Northampton defending my world final.

ANY ONE YOU WOULD LIKE TO THANK?

Mervyn McReyonlds (engine builder) Allister Calvin for the things he has learned me over the years and especially my dad for the time effort and money he has done to help me out and all my sponsors and mechanics and drivers who helped if I need a hand.

          

      Jane Carter


Originally featured in Oval Racing News May 2006 and reproduced by kind permission

Stuart Smyth

Anyone who has taken more than a passing interest in the Spedeworth Stock Rods over the past few years could be forgiven for thinking that National Points Champion Stuart Smyth was a driver with money to burn.

As well as two immaculately turned out Vauxhall Novas, the talented 29-year-old also has the luxury of a smart lorry in which to transport his close knit group of friends and family members around the nation’s ovals.

The reality, however, is rather different. While the 447 team can lay claim to being one of the most professional, efficiently-run operations in the sport, it certainly hasn’t got access to a bottomless pit of financial resources.

Take the workshop, for example. Anyone visiting Stuart at home shouldn’t expect to find state-of-the-art facilities. In fact, his race cars are stored in two single garages he rents off the council near his parents’ home in Uxbridge, Middlesex.

As you can imagine, space is at a premium so all car preparation has to take place outside. “I haven’t even got power in the garages so I have to run an extension lead from my Mum and Dad’s house,” he says. “If it’s raining I either have to work in the wet or the car doesn’t get prepared.”

Stuart is also heavily reliant on the financial backing of Dad Colin – “We go halves on everything and without his help I certainly wouldn’t be racing” – as well as the support of a small army of sponsors, including Lyndale Engines.

“People think we’ve got a lot of money because the cars always look nice, but that’s just down to putting in the time and effort,” he insists. “I do stuff on the cars before work, then I’ll come back at lunchtime to do some more, then again after work.”

Whether it’s a case of jealousy, people forming the wrong impression of him or his reputation for being rather competitive out on the track, Stuart concedes he probably isn’t the most popular driver in the pits.

“To be honest a lot of people don’t like me and I don’t really know why because I help out a lot of other drivers with their cars,” he says. “I never used to speak to Kim Carter and I think he thought I was a horrible kid when I was a bit younger, but then he eventually got to talk to me and now we always park next to each other and have a good laugh.”

That’s not to say he is always the perfect gent. Three bans – including a three month stint for a retaliatory “tap” which resulted in a rival sliding into the wall at Ipswich – prove his competitive edge can sometimes get the better of him.

“I’ve been racing for about 18 years and if I’ve only been banned three times in my career then I think I’ve done well to be honest,” he says. “I’ve never got out and had a fight. If something has happened I usually stay by my trailer and fix what needs repairing. Occasionally, however, you do see red.”

His most recent ban came after last year’s European Championship when he was judged to have unfairly closed the door on arch rival Andy Sturt and was given a month’s gardening leave. It’s a decision he still thinks is unfair.

“I didn’t feel he was in the gap so when we came to the bend I shut the door,” he explains. “Andy’s come crashing into the side, we’ve both gone wide and Tristan (Jackson) has gone past. They said I’d tried to put him up on the shale, but I didn’t.”

While the pair are now on speaking terms – after Spedeworth South’s Deane Wood had a quiet word - they’re never likely to become best mates.

“I think it’s just a bit of rivalry and it was the same with Tick Steward and Mel Cooke years ago,” says Stuart. “We’re running so close that you can put a fag paper between us when we’re together. If he lifts a bit early then you give him a tap, but that’s racing. Sometimes he’ll do something you think is a bit out of order, but then you’ll probably end up doing something similar to him.”

Stuart has arguably been the more successful of the two as far as bagging major championships are concerned. Since winning the European Championship back in 1998, he has picked up a string of titles, including the English and Southern.

The only crowns to get away so far are the British – which is currently held by Sturt – and the World which has eluded them both. Stuart is at a loss to explain his lack of success in the big race. “The best I’ve had in the World is fourth,” he says. “I don’t know why, maybe it’s the pressure.”

At the time of writing – at the end of May – things are going pretty well. Stuart has a healthy 62 point lead over his main rival and is a whopping 159 points ahead of Lee Nichols who is in third spot.

But even if Lady Luck shines on him at this year’s World Final, which is part of the two day spectacular planned for Ringwood in August, Stuart believes he’ll still remain loyal to the Stock Rods.

“To be honest I’ve thought about the Superstox and I've also considered a 2Litre Hot Rod, but they’re double the price and a Stock Rod is just as quick, so I can’t see the point of moving,” he says. “Obviously I’d love a National Hot Rod, but they’re way out of my price league.”

Winning the gold roof would be a fitting reward for Stuart’s 18 years of dedication to the sport. A product of the Spedeworth Ministox – so often a breeding ground for champions – he initially dabbled in the 1300 Stock Cars after being given a Metro.

His first meeting was the National Championship weekend at Wisbech. By his own admission he got “a bit keen” in the second heat and sent someone into the wall. In the final itself he was leading until the engine started to overheat and he was eventually caught by the driver he’d dispatched previously, who took his revenge!

A family friend then bought him his first Stock Rod and he soon found himself competing against the likes of Mark Willis, Andy Steward, Rick Lemmon, Mel Cooke and even his own cousin, Brian Smith.

Once again, his first meeting out at Wimbledon was memorable – but for all the right reasons this time. A first and a second place in the heats was followed up by a superb win in the Plough Lane 50; a remarkable achievement on his debut.

Towards the end of the season an unscheduled meeting with one of the unforgiving Wimbledon fence posts meant a new car was required. A Racetech Starlet was duly built, powered by a Longhurst engine, and this heralded a turning point in his career.

“We’d dropped into the yellows, but then things started to get going and we haven’t looked back since,” says Stuart. “We made it up to the red grade, had some good races with people and started getting some wins.”

Towards the end of the 1990s, Stuart finally succumbed to peer pressure and followed the crowd into Vauxhall Novas.

“Fortunately, Brian had a lot of experience with Novas so all that was put straight into my car,” says Stuart. “In its first meeting at Ipswich, we had a sixth, a fourth and then a second behind Andy Sturt in the final. The following weekend we went up to Cowdenbeath and came second in the British Championship.”

Within weeks the new car – powered by an engine put together by cousin Brian – had taken him to victory in the European Championship at Ipswich which, unsurprisingly, ranks as one of his favourite tracks.

“The grid positions were picked out of a hat and I drew 12th,” he recalls. “However, everyone kept crashing and after three stoppages I was on the outside front row. I thought it could be on, but there were still a lot of big names behind me and although I was fairly quick I wasn’t really one to watch at that time.”

The win really boosted his confidence. His second title – the London Championship – came later in the season, with the English crown following two years later. Amazingly, this first Nova is still his number one car – even though it celebrates its eighth birthday this season.

“If you keep on top of the maintenance and replace panels when they’re needed, then the cars will last,” says Stuart. “My newest car was built by Chris Lattka and I’ve just started using it more – it was too nice to race at first!”

It’s clear from talking to Stuart that oval racing is a huge part of his life. When he’s not working on his own cars – or spending time with his three-year-old daughter, Georgia – it’s odds on that he’ll be at a race track.

“If I’m not racing then we’ll go somewhere to watch,” he admits. “I’d like to win the World and the British, but really I just want to enjoy it. It is a hobby and you do it for fun, but I don’t know anyone out there who can say they don’t want to win.”

 

*Stuart would like to thank the following for their support: Family and friends – including Dad Colin, Lyndale Engines, Royton Group, Simpson Race Exhausts, ADR Engineering, Miller Motorsport, Race Embroidery, KB Recovery, Trade Winch, Byfleet Motor Recycling, Thameside Trailers and Gunner Motorsport

By Rob Griffin


Originally featured in Oval Racing News December 2005 and reproduced by kind permission

Andy Sturt

Written on the inside of British Stock Rod champion Andy Sturt’s Nova is the slogan: ‘Dirty Sturty’. It’s a light-hearted reference to his reputation as a hard-charging driver, whose uncompromising style has won him as many enemies as admirers.

“My team gave me the nickname when I was collecting black flags like they were going out of fashion,” he admits with a grin. “I’ll put it on the car, but I’m definitely not a dirty driver - I’m just very, very aggressive.”

It’s fair to say the pilot of the red and yellow 168 machine is one of oval racing’s more controversial characters. Opinionated, passionate and brutally honest, he’s never been afraid to speak his mind, regardless of the possible consequences.

But the 38-year-old insists he doesn’t go looking for confrontations – either on or off the track. “I’ve had quite a few arguments because I say what I think and people don’t like that,” he says. “However, it’s only because I want what’s best for the formula.”

Andy joined the Stock Rod ranks in the early 1990s, having already clocked up a decade of experience in the Junior Bangers at Smallfield (when he was just 15), the 1700cc Hot Rods and the Super Saloons at Layhams farm.

However, he didn’t enjoy a dream start to his Spedeworth career. His first car – an ex-Terry Jones Toyota Starlet, bought for £1,000 – was written off at Wisbech in only its second outing after he collided with Rick Lemmon and was hit by Andy Steward.

“I ended up throwing the car in the skip,” he recalls. “All I could salvage was one wheel and the engine. The rest of it had been totally blitzed.”

Undeterred, a rolling chassis was acquired for £400 and, after a handful of meetings, his first win was recorded at the now defunct Aldershot stadium. A move up to blue grade swiftly followed.

An impressive double victory at the Ipswich Spedeweekend – where he won both the British Masters and the European Challenge Cup – signalled the arrival of a new kid on the block.

Within four years the Leatherhead-based star was sitting pretty at the top of the points, on the back of some impressive performances in a collection of mainly self-built Starlets, latterly powered by Dave Longhurst engines.

“I’ve got to be honest and say it helped when the top boys such as the Stewards and Mark Willis moved out of the formula,” admits Andy. “The competition certainly got a little bit easier for me.”

By the late 1990s he was forced to bow to peer pressure and buy a Vauxhall Nova – in his case an un-raced Tick Steward machine – which he started campaigning at fast tracks such as Ipswich, while keeping his trusty Starlet for Arlington.

However, he doesn’t believe the switch to front-wheel drive cars has been good for the formula. “It was much more entertaining when everyone was in Starlets as the racing was more even and more affordable,” he says. “It’s still a good little formula, but we’re no longer racing Stock Rods, they’re more like 1400 Hot Rods.”

In fact, he cites the amount of money required to be competitive – estimated at around £4,000 to get a brand new car on the track, plus annual running costs of over £2,000 – as a key reason why so few lower grade drivers stick around.

The gradual introduction of racing extras such as adjustable caster and camber on both sides, along with stainless steel exhausts, have made it very expensive, says Andy, who doesn’t want to see any more changes in the near future.

“It’s too late to turn the clock back because people have already bought these bits, but I just hope the formula is now left alone,” he adds. “In future, they should ask the top drivers from each promotion their views before changes are made.”

By his own admission, Andy is in the fortunate position of being able to rely on the support of three key sponsors – Mark Fuller at FGS Engines, Tim Barnes Fabrications and K&S Moss who supply his tyres.

“Without them there’s no way I’d be racing,” he agrees. “I haven’t got a lot of money so all my success is down to the commitment of everyone involved. I’ve always said it’s a combination of the back-up support and preparation in the workshop that wins the races.”

As well as his sponsors, Andy is keen to pay tribute to his brother Martin, fiancée Hayley and father Mick for their 100% support. In fact, Mick was also a useful Stock Car man in the old Magnette days before retiring to bring up Andy, Martin and their other brother Ian on his own after a marriage breakdown. “He had a hell of a job but did it superbly,” says Andy. “That’s why he’ll forever be a top man in my world.”

The dedication of the 168 team was rewarded in 1999 with victory in the British championship at Wimbledon; a feat which was repeated in 2005. What may come as a surprise, though, is that these are the only two major titles Andy has to his name.

Despite collecting a hatful of championships down the years, including the Southern and Super Sussex, his luck seems to run out when there’s a roof at stake. That’s not to say he hasn’t come close. Runner-up positions have been claimed in the World championship (twice), European (twice) and National (twice).

“I’ve probably had more second places over the last five years than any other Stock Rod driver,” says Andy, shaking his head. “I have been leading all the championships at one stage, but something always seems to go wrong.”

Take 2005 for example. Although it’s probably been his most successful year in terms of wins, the big races still haven’t gone his way.

By half distance in the 50-lap World final he was comfortably in the lead when his tyres inexplicably went off. “It was just like someone had jumped on the track and covered them with oil,” he recalls. “I went into one corner and it had massive under steer, then in the next it was over steering. I knew then that I’d lost the World final and it felt like someone had ripped my stomach out.”

His hopes of collecting the English championship evaporated when he got a puncture, while his quest for the European title ended in more controversial fashion thanks to a collision with arch-rival Stuart Smyth.

In fact, the battles between these two have been an interesting side show in recent years. “I take my hat off to him as he’s a very good driver and fast around most of the tracks,” says Andy. “However, we’ve certainly had our differences in the past and we’re never likely to always see eye-to-eye.”

While still on the subject of racing, Andy does have some serious reservations about how meetings are being clerked. Indeed, he feels so strongly about the issue that he has even threatened to pack up completely if it continues.

“At times I don’t think I get treated fairly down at Arlington,” he says. “I seem to be the only one going around the outside, but if I end up touching another car on the way through, I’m black crossed, which isn’t fair. I can get on the power when others can’t because I’ve got a better handling car, but I’m being penalised for it.”

For similar reasons he doesn’t relish trips north of the border.

“Scotland just doesn’t seem to work for me,” he says. “The back of the trailer gets past Carlisle and it’s like I’ve caught a disease. I just don’t feel they are fair to me at Cowdenbeath.”

He cites being docked from second place in the World championship and getting disqualified for climbing out of his car during a stoppage in the opening laps of another final, as two of the reasons why he is reluctant to return.

“I didn’t even go there to defend my ORCi championship as I wouldn’t have won it,” he says. “Even if I was a lap ahead, I’d either be taken out or something would go wrong and I just can’t accept that. I’m certainly not slating anybody, but that’s just the way it is.”

Last season saw Andy scale down the number of meetings attended from 38 to 22, due to major building work being carried out on his house and the time constraints involved in running his own mobile phone business, AK Cellular.

Unusually for a top racing driver, he also has other hobbies. As well as playing golf, the West Ham United fan is a keen amateur footballer who plays regularly in the Surrey intermediate league.

“Last Saturday I played football in the morning and as soon as the whistle went I got changed, jumped in the van and went straight up to race at Ipswich,” he says. “I was late but at least I got there!”

He’s also honest enough to admit that a distinct lack of cash is one of the principle reasons why he has stuck with the Stock Rods, although a switch to the National Hot Rods would be the dream move if money was no object.

He’s already had a short spell in the 2litre Hot Rods – where he reached red grade and notched up seven final wins in 18 outings – but the costs were getting too prohibitive, even with the support of his sponsors.

“I still like the Stock Rods and they are one of the only truly national formulas,” he adds. “It means that you can race all over England, as well as over in Ireland and up in Scotland, so if I ever fell out with Spedeworth I could go to Hednesford or Arena.”

For the time being, however, he is planning to concentrate on pursuing the sport’s biggest crowns. “I’ll be 100% honest and say that I would dearly love to win a roof in the coming season,” he says. “I’d love to retain my British, but I don’t really care which one it is because winning any roof in a Stock Rod is very hard to do.”

By next March he should also have the services of a brand new Nova – the bare bones of which are currently sheltering under a tarpaulin in his back garden – in which to challenge for honours. Andy, however, is playing down his chances.

“I normally follow a good year with a bad one,” he adds with a grin. “I’m just hoping that’s not the case in 2006.”

By Rob Griffin


CARTER RACING

HOW DID YOU GET IN TO RACING?

I got in to racing when I use to go and watch at Ringwood many years ago. My wife Jane’s family use to race

WHERE WAS YOUR FIRST RACE AND WHAT WAS IT LIKE?

My first race was at Ringwood raceway and I got lapped a few times That was back in the days of Paffey Derek Luke Perry clack Les Bone and so on.

WHAT WAS CARS LIKE WHEN YOU STARTED?

Cars was not like today just use to put roll cage in them hand paint them just use the engine that came with the car straight off the road and just put a cam in it and yokies on it and was away racing.

WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST CAR?

My first stock rod was an Mk1 escort, which I got in a swap for a gearbox and just put my own roll cage in and went racing

YOU BUILD YOUR OWN CAR/ ENGINES?

In the days of escorts and starlets I did all my own engines then I went over to a nova which I bought off Mark Paffey witch had a Dave Longhurst engine in it and I have been with DLRD ever since, Dave’s been good to me cant see me ever leaving him DLRD all the way!

WHAT'S THE BEST MOMENT, AND YOUR WORST MOMENT IN RACING?

My best moment was when I won ENGLISH in 2001 and getting 3rd in the worlds in 2005, My worst moment was when I was in the lead at the national weekend at Hednesford we had several restarts and car was going well and my throttle cable broke.

 DO YOU THINK MOST COMPETITIVE DRIVER IS?

Smyth, Gunner, Sturt, Barber both the Philps, Leech they all have their day and every one in front of me.

HAVE ALL YOUR FAMILY BEEN A GOOD SUPPORT TO YOU IN RACING?

My wife Jane has been there from day one she’s 100% behind me with out Jane would be hard for me.

IS THERE ANY SPONSORS WOULD YOU LIKE TO THANK?

DLRD TOTTON MOTOR FACTORS, K&M HEATING, S D SPIERS BUILDERS, MINI DIGGER HIRE, RUNNING WHEELS VEHICLE REPAIR, THAT’S SMYTH RACING AND GUNNER MOTORSPORT

WHAT WAS YOUR BEST CAR?

My first nova that I got off Mark Paffey done me well

WHAT WAS YOUR FAVOURITE TRACK?

Ipswich/ Hednesford and I do like St Day down in pasty land like a roller coaster ride

WHAT WAS YOUR WORST TRACK?

Not really got one had good and bad days at them all

WHAT TITLES HAVE YOU WON?

English 2001

East Anglia x 2


John Ridley His Story So Far....

WHEN DID YOU START RACING.

I started racing April 1989,it would have been a summer 1988 but in those days you had to build your car first then go on a waiting list for a licence, that took about 7 months. but then your would around 50-55 cars on a Wednesday night at Arlington,4 heats and only top eight went into final.

WHAT AGE DID YOU START RACING.

I had just turned 20.

WHERE WAS YOUR FIRST RACE.

My first race meeting was at Aldershot

WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST CAR.

My first car was ford escort mk 2 ,it was my dads car he had on the road.

  

WHAT MADE YOU GET IN TO RACING.

When I was around 10 my uncle took me and my dad to Wimbledon and this started it all off, when I left school I chose panel beating, this was really so I could go racing as soon as i could afford to.

DO YOU BUILD YOUR OWN STOCK RODS.

Yes I have built them with the exception of the little spell I had with a nova (that was loaned to me by my boss at the time)  that’s 2 Mk 2 escorts, 5 starlets and 2 Corsa's.

DO YOU BUILD YOUR OWN ENGINES

I have build quite a few but these Vauxhalls you have to leave it to specialist, I have been using mark fuller of F.G.S engines for last 7-8 years who looks after me very well.

HAVE YOU RACE IN ANY OTHER FORMULAS.

No, I thought about 2 litres b4 and they are two expensive and when we go round some tracks quicker then them why bother, but I have a very  strong passion for the stock rod formula, I think it’s the best out there.

WHAT'S THE BEST AND WORSE MOMENTS IN RACING.

Not sure of best moments I have several I suppose 2nd in southern championship, followed by 2nd Sussex series [only beaten by Sturty] But any race you go forward and don’t get damage is good.

Worst moment has to be my first Corsa at the British at Wimbledon, it was really the first race I did in it ,I got spun at end of home straight and had a very large crash,

WHO DO THINK IS THE MOST COMPETIVE DRIVER.

Well with in Spedeworth its Stuart Smyth and Andy Sturt

But nationally its got to be any body who wins a title it so competitive out there, there is not slow cars anymore.

HAVE YOUR FAMILY BEEN A GOOD SUPPORT TO YOUR RACING.

Yes, as many of no my dad is always with me, he really loves it and with out his support in my early days properly would not be racing now. He has only missed 2 meetings in all 18 years racing and that was only due to poor health.

WHAT SPONSORS WOULD YOU LIKE TO THANK

F.G.S. race engines, Ashford Vauxhall Spares, Adastripe Graphics, and Caffyns the company I work for.

WHAT WERE THE CARS LIKE WHEN YOU FIRST STARTED RACING.

Most cars were Escorts at the time and they had arches, no skirts and front panels allowed at that time, cages were bolt in [ready for quick change if crashed] and nothing flash in way of dash quick release steering wheels, all basic and mine was put together using mainly 2nd hand parts.

WHAT WAS YOUR BEST CAR

It has to be my current car I have had much more success with this one , however my 1st Corsa was the best looking car I have had and was first Corsa in England on the track.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE TRACK

Without any doubt ARLINGTON

WHAT IS YOUR WORST TRACK

Don’t really have a worst track as long as its oval,

WHAT IS YOUR AMBITION IN STOCK RODS

Well would be nice to win a championship, been close in southern and London before. The majors are a little bit out of reach, so the Southern would be my ideal achievement; I have had 2nd two 3rds and 6th in last 4 years.


The Good Old Days

 

After a couple of years of racing Hot Rods with Spedeworth and then a season of racing PRI Mini Rods I was hugely attracted to the “new formula” that Spedeworth were introducing called “Stock Rods”.  Right from the start it was obvious that the formula would be very popular as costs were soaring in Hot Rods and here was a cheap formula with large fields of cars guaranteed.  The rules were, as I recall, quite simple.  Stock, as in what the manufacturer put on the car when sold, and all lights in full working order.  Talking around the pits it was obvious that Anglias and the ubiquitous Fiat 124 would be the car to have but bookings were going to be difficult.  Now back then you had a couple of options for getting bookings for your favorite tracks, mine was Wimbledon as it was nearest to where I lived at Eltham.  Firstly you had to be prepared to travel and secondly you needed something different. 

 

I had already decided on a car which was almost race ready as I watched the first meeting at Aldershot where a young Deane Wood rolled his car on the pits bend to claim the first Stock Rod flip.  I had scoured the local papers for something different and there it was, a 1950-something four-door Austin A35 with 948cc engine in the “Under a Tenner” section!!  It was so different that whilst building it on my front drive I had the entire PRI Northampton Time banger team stop outside my home to check it out and have a chat on their way to Lydden Hill.

 

 

As previously mentioned it had to remain “stock” but in common with many other of the pioneer drivers I totally ignored that to see what I could get away with.  I did have, after all, a rather ancient piece of tin so any advantage I could glean seemed fair game.  I stripped all the double-skinning out, changed the diff. to a locked one out of a friend’s superstock, changed the head and cam (don’t ask!!) and swapped the Zenith carb. for an S.U off my MiniRod – even in those days an A35 was a classic and who would notice the carb swap??  Then it was down to Jon Mowatt’s rolling road for a few tweaks to get the best out of the old girl and she was ready for a practice run at the next Stock Rod meeting held at Ipswich where I took her, albeit I wasn’t booked in.

 

With a few tyre size changes, ie. squeezing 175’s onto those hideously narrow rims, changing wheel widths would have been too obvious, it was possible to get a quite respectable performance out of “Rollerball” as I called the car.

 

 

After a few practice laps I was getting a bit cocky and thought I’d push her to the limit round the car park turn.  After a 180 turn I though I’d hold her backwards and reverse-whip her back into the racing line.  Bit ambitious, as this proved to be my undoing and over I went backwards!!  Reflecting from my position hanging upside-down on the shale in a puddle of water I realized that the move wasn’t best planned in such a narrow and tall car, but she survived the roll rather well!!

 

 

We were ready to race and a bookings entry, which included Ringwood and even Yarmouth on a Tuesday night guaranteed I got every Wimbledon and Aldershot booking, I wanted too.  And of course, I had something of a crowd pleaser which was a bit different and I know helped get the races which others didn’t.  I built a 105E Anglia alongside the A35 and even took the two cars to Ringwood, which in those days just wasn’t a common thing to do. 

 

 

The 105E had a 4:4 diff. in it and used anything up to 185’s on the standard rims for tracks such as Ringwood and Ipswich whilst 145’s were OK for the smaller, tighter tracks.

 

 

 I had the privilege of being invited to the Ipswich Speedweekend to support the Hot Rod World Final and chose the Anglia for that event but overcooked exiting a turn and did something I rarely did (at least not without rolling) and spun out.

 

 

Through the meetings at Ipswich and Yarmouth I met up with a number of the Braintree based drivers such as Pete ‘Pandaman’ Holloway, one of the sports characters, and Ivan Barker and this ultimately led to me racing at Braintree Auto Club where the Anglia finally met its maker after yet another rollover.

 

 

A car that particularly caught my eye in those early days was the Stock Rod Sunbeam Stilletto of #174 Dave Welsh, the engine of which he had blue-printed but which never quite went as well as it could as the Stromberg cars were a tad temperamental.  I bought that car from Dave to race as a Stock Rod and had it set up by Charlie Carley at Autocar of Elephant & Castle who breathed life into it.

 

 

It never did go out as a Stock Rod as I was drawn to the dirt oval at Braintree and it really flew when I used it at BAC quickly elevating me to red top in the Hot Rod class, so how good that would have been on the Spedeworth ovals I will never know!! 

 

 

There were quite a few drivers who took to the Stock Rods as a cheaper alternative to their normal steeds, such as Dave and Chris Olding and Bert Hawkins.  There were lots of one-timers never to be seen again.  But most importantly it was a great spectacle with loads of cars, lots of action, rollovers and drivers having fun.

 

 

The A35 served me well as the formula progressed but the Fiats were definitely the cars to have although a good Escort was a useful tool too.  There were a couple of Honda S800’s that really flew but I stuck with my old faithful.  I seem to recall that I never once needed to change a headlamp despite leaning heavily on cars in crowded corners especially at Wimbledon which still had a shale surface and with that locked diff. there was only one way round, sideways on full opposite lock with foot flat on the loud pedal.  A big-end knock signalled that it was time to retire the old girl and a marker tyre provided an excellent launch ramp into a perfect full roll to finish her off.  In the pits afterwards some of the chrome was acquired by souvenir hunters and she was finally left outside a scrapyard in Deptford never to be seen again.

 

Alan Humphrey


Story reproduced  by  kind permission of Rob Griffin (Originally featured ORN 2006)

Chris Lattka may have been the defending champion, but even his fiercest supporters weren’t backing him to retain his World Stock Rod crown at the Swaffham Spedeweekend. With just one win all season – a heat victory at Ipswich in July – “Gunner” found himself in the bizarre position of going into the event as an underdog, while the in-form Alastair Calvin was installed as the hot favourite.

But after a terrific drive in atrociously wet conditions, the 29-year-old Scotsman took the flag ahead of a fast-closing Stuart Smyth (who was later docked a place for contact) to claim his fourth World title - one more than rival Alan Connolly. “Most people had written me off this year, but I proved ‘em wrong again, eh?” he says with a grin when Oval Racing News congratulates him. “You never say you’re going to win until you pass that chequered flag as it can all blow up in your face. ”Not that Gunner – the nickname was his old CB handle and has stuck with him throughout his career – blames anyone for dismissing his chances. Even he was convinced that he’d be leaving the Norfolk venue empty-handed.

“I’ve had a bad year and I just didn’t think we were going to do it this time,” he admits. “In fact, I was planning to re-paint the roof red before this weekend, but Harry (Burgoyne) persuaded me to leave it gold!” ORN has caught up with the re-crowned champ in the rain-sodden Swaffham pits. It’s about two hours after his victory and the mass of well-wishers that have been swarming around him have finally started to disperse .“It was a good race, eh?” says Gunner, sweeping water off a plastic garden chair and slumping down in the seat. “You were never sure what was going to happen with the weather. It was unbelievable at the end of the race with everyone out on the track.”

His beautiful trophy is on display at the back of the team coach and a bottle of champagne – still unopened – sits on a nearby table. The only liquid being consumed, it seems, is Coca-Cola. No plans for a boozy celebration then? “I can’t drink because we’ve got to drive back home tonight,” he says. “We also haven’t got much time for celebrating as we’re back working on the car tomorrow night because we’re off racing for the next few weekends. ”With Gunner’s mobile constantly ringing and a steady stream of people coming over to either pass on their congratulations or ask for his help, we agree to catch up during the week for a proper interview. A few days later I ring him at H&J Burgoyne, the business run by his uncles in Falkirk which, as well as being his place of work, doubles as his garage and car building headquarters. I ask him if he had a good reception back at the ranch.

“Oh aye!” he laughs. “The boys that work here with me didn’t think I was going to do it so they got a shock, eh? The phone’s been ringing non-stop and I even got a call from Alan Connolly because I beat his record of three World final wins.”In fact, one of Connolly’s mechanics had even sent Gunner a text message on the Sunday night joking that the team was going to buy another Nova in order to get back into the Stock Rods! However, the 658 team hasn’t got much time to bathe in the glory.

As we talk, everyone is busy preparing the Nova for the coming weekend’s Irish Open championship and World Masters Trophy at Ballymena, and it’s a race against time to get everything finished. The re-built engine has just arrived back from Lyndale – they’re automatically stripped after major events to ensure they’re legal – and is in the throes of being fitted back into the car in time for Friday’s trip across the water. (It proved to be a relatively successful jaunt with a win and second place recorded in the heats before he came runner-up to Calvin in the World Masters final).

The following weekend is the Scottish Championship at Gunner’s home track of Cowdenbeath and then it’s a trip down to the Rockingham Raceway in Northamptonshire for the two-day Ovalfest. After that, there’s just enough time for a week’s holiday soaking up the sun in Spain before the European Championship at Cowdenbeath which, incidentally, is one of the only major titles that Gunner hasn’t held at some stage in his career. It’s a relentless schedule but one that Gunner, fiancée Sharon, daughter Annalise and his loyal team – including brother Tony, Craig Brogan, Geo and Big Al - have become used to in their drive to stay competitive at the highest level of the sport.

With Gunner’s brother Jonathan also an established star in the Stock Rods, it’s clear that everyone involved in the Lattkas’ racing has their work cut out. “It’s almost like a full-time job,” agrees Gunner. “We do three or four nights-a-week, as well as the weekends. If we’re not off racing, then we’re either building cars for other people or trying to keep our own running properly. ”And that’s not to mention the time spent travelling. A trek down from his Carronshore home to Hednesford will mean a nine hour round trip, while a return visit to Ipswich requires a jaw dropping 15 hours on the road.

That’s why his stunning coach – painted in his red, blue and silver colour scheme – is such an essential part of the set-up. “It’s a home-from-home and we’ve got it the way we want it now,” he says. “If we didn’t have it we’d need two vans and two trailers. It also cuts down on the hotel bills and if you’re tired on the way back from a meeting you can pull over and sleep .”Luxury and convenience, however, don’t come cheap and Gunner had to sell his Mondeo Ghia for £6,000 to help finance it. When you factor in the time and costs involved in re-panelling and painting, its estimated value is now close to £50,000.“A lot of people want to buy it, but I wouldn’t sell,” he says. “It’s got space for two cars and there’s about 20 wheels and tyres in the back. In fact, there’s probably enough stuff in there to build a spare car. It’s going to have a new engine in time for all the travelling next year.”

An oval racing enthusiast for as long as he can remember, Gunner’s actual career behind the wheel goes back 16 years. Considering his uncles are the infamous Burgoyne brothers – all legendary names in the sport – it was practically written in the stars that the young Gunner would eventually follow them onto the short circuits. “I had been going to watch the racing since the early 1980s and they got me involved in it,” he recalls. “I remember going to the Spedeweekends back then and watching the Saloons. That’s what stock car racing was all about.”His first taste of competitive action came as a 12-year-old in the Ministox back in 1990 and it didn’t take him long to get into the swing of things. A fine third place in his first final - at Armadale - provided a taste of what was to come. Three years later he made the step up to the Stock Rods. After a season spent getting to grips with the formula in one of Jock’s old Toyota Starlets, he moved onto a Vauxhall Nova and ended his second year as National Points champion.

His first major win – the British championship – came in 1996 and this was followed the next year by the first of his four World crowns as he led home Alan Connolly and Dave Leech at Hednesford. Two subsequent World final wins followed – Cowdenbeath in 1999 where he came home ahead of Eddy Trofer and Ian Stuart – and last year at Northampton where he beat Robert McDonald and Kim Carter to the flag. He has also won the British, Scottish, ORC, Midland and National Championships, as well as the Best in Britain and numerous track titles at both Cowdenbeath and Knockhill. His trophy cabinet practically groans under the weight of silverware." I've had some great help off people,” he says. “The support of your sponsors is very important. Harry and Jock have been particularly terrific to me and if it wasn’t for them then I wouldn’t be able to do the racing.”

Over the last five years Gunner has also established himself as a dab hand at building cars and there are now plenty of his creations dotted around the country, including one owned by his mate Smyth, Spedeworth’s National Points champion.In fact, it’s almost impossible to keep track of how many cars he has built – both for himself and others – over the last couple of years. He’s personally been behind the wheel of three different cars this year and others are already on the drawing board. “Jock used to build my cars, but then in 1999 I started doing them myself and have done them ever since,” he says. “The quickest I’ve built one is three days but to do it all normally takes four weeks if you’re just working the nights.”

Unsurprisingly, his commitment to the sport doesn’t leave him much time for other leisure pursuits. “My hobby is racing and if you want to do it seriously then you’ve got to put in the time and effort,” he says. “You just can’t do anything else.” However, the arrival of his young family means Gunner doesn’t burn the midnight oil quite as much as he used to in the past. “I’ve worked right through the night finishing cars and got home at 6am,” he recalls. “We’ve slowed down a bit now!” A desire to experiment was behind his decision to put together a Vauxhall Tigra for the start of this season – which was unveiled at the NEC show in January - but it was a car that he never really managed to get sorted to his liking.

“I’ve given the Tigra to Mark Barber as a kind of sponsorship, so we’ll see how he gets on with it,” he says, citing a lack of opportunity to practice as a key reason why it never really showed its full potential.The time spent battling with the car meant a large chunk of his World Championship year was blighted by poor form. In fact, it wasn’t until he debuted what was to be his World Final winning car at the Ipswich Spedeweekend in July that he had a welcome change of fortune with a fine heat win ahead of Dave Leech and Wayne Leedell.However, even with this new machine he was unable to completely shake off the problems that had dogged him for most of the season. Crisis point was reached at the National Championship weekend at Hednesford in early August.

“It was disastrous and nothing went right for us,” recalls Gunner. “We then put a new engine in the car and went down to Swaffham to do some testing the week before the World final and it absolutely tipped it down.” Maybe those extra circuits in the wet proved to be decisive because Gunner was a class apart the following weekend. Within a handful of laps he was sitting in second spot behind Incarace’s Stuart Wright. The pair then battled for the lead before Gunner edged ahead on lap 11 and never looked back.

“I remember following Stuart Wright and thinking I could get by him,” he recalls. “I did get past, then he got by me again and I knew then it was going to be a close fought race. We then started to pull out a gap on the third and fourth placed drivers. It was all about keeping your head.” One person who would have been secretly delighted with his success is fellow racer Neil Truran, who has already agreed to buy the Nova, although the arrangement is that Gunner keeps hold of it until after the European championship. “It will certainly be all hands on deck after that meeting to get some cars built,” laughs Gunner. “I might end up doing a few meetings in my brother’s spare Corsa. It’s a bit smashed up at the moment, but I might try and get it fixed.”

Looking to the future, another new Nova and, possibly, a Corsa should be ready in time for the start of what is likely to be a hectic 2007 season. “I’m going to do some travelling and show the gold roof off a bit more than I’ve done this year,” he says. So does that mean he’s planning on sticking with the Stock Rods for a while? Is there anything else he’d like to try? “I don’t know,” he says. “I had a go in Harry’s 2Litre Saloon at Swaffham on the Friday night, but it’s not for me. You’ve got to go to work on a Monday and I saw the knocks that Harry and that used to get, eh?”

The Stock Rods, he believes, are a great formula. “You can build and repair them yourself and that keeps the costs down,” he says. “They’ll cost you about four to five grand, compared to the £30,000 for a National Hot Rod or £15,000 for a 2Litre.”Packed grids and close competition, he adds, means that the overall package is pretty hard to beat. “The formula is perfect as it is now,” he says. “They just need to leave the rules as they are because it’s spot on." How about his chances of winning a third consecutive World Crown? On this point Gunner remains very non-committal." I'll just take it as it comes, eh?” he says. “I’ll give it a good shot and if it happens, it happens. I thought I was getting a bit too old for it a couple of weeks back, but it seems there’s still a few meetings in me yet!”

Gunner would like to say a big thank you to his sponsors:

H&J Burgoyne

Lyndale Engines

Burgoynes Road Rescue

Foundry Steels

North Road Garage

Glendinning Plant

Saline Motors

MCM Car Sales

McGregor Building Services

Paul Brown Plumbing and Heating

That Smyth Racing

Great Yarmouth Bathrooms

Roll of honour

World champion           1997, 1999, 2005, 2006

National points 1995, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004

National champion        2005

British champion           1996, 2001, 2002

Scottish champion         1997, 1998, 1999, 2004

Best in Britain                 1996

ORC                                  1997

Midland champion         2004, 2005

Cowdenbeath                  1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004

Knockhill                          2003, 2004, 2005


 

                                                       "That Smyth Racing" ( Stuart Smyth)

When did you start racing?

I started in 1988

What age did you start?

I was 12 years old.

Where was your first race?

At Wimbledon

What was your first car?

My first car was a ministox then a Starlet Stock Rod

What made you get into racing?

Got evolved in racing by my cousin Brian Smith

Do you build your own stock rod?

No, Ken Nevard and Chris Lattka

Do you build your own engines?

No Lyndale Engines build them

Have you raced any other formulas?

Ministox and 1300 Stock Cars

What is the best and worst moment in racing?

Best moment; Winning my first major title ...The European

Worst moment; Smashing my first ever Starlet Stock Rod up

 

Who do you think is the most competitive driver?

Gunner, Carter and Sturty

Have your family been a good support to you in racing?

Yes a big thanks to Mum and Dad

What sponsors would you like to thank?

The Royton Group, Lyndale Engines, ARD Engineering, Simpson Exhaust, Simpson Recycling, Fleet recycling Gunner Motor Sport, Tradewich, Race Embroidery

What were cars like when you first started racing?

Same as now really

What was your best car?

My first nova i had

What is your favourite track?

Hednesford and Ipswich

What is your worst track?

Yarmouth

What is you ambition in stock rods?

To win the last two major titles that keep avoiding me the World and the British

By Jane Carter


 

 

                                                          Rick Lee’s story of his time in Stock Rods

When did you start racing?

It was Easter 1974.

What age did you start?

I was 18 years old.

Where was your first race?

At the old St Austell stadium.

What was your first car?

It was a 1962 Hillman minx. Back then it was a case of buy the car on the weekend strip it out and prepare it to race on Tuesday night.

What made you get into racing?

I have always loved car racing but never had enough money to go circuit racing so ovals it was.

Do you build your own stock rod?

No, the first 2 stock rods I bought ready to race. The latest one was built for me by Ian and Mike Hibberd.

Do you build your own engines?

No I leave all my engine work to Lyndales.

Have you raced any other formulas?

Yes I raced bangers, Cornish rods and hot rods.

What is the best and worst moment in racing?

Best moment; Winning the stock rod point 2003.

Worst moment; rolling my Cornish rod down the back straight at St Day in 1994.

Who do you think is the most competitive driver?

I have three names Stuart Smyth, Gunner and Kim Carter.

Have your family been a good support to you in racing?

Yes my wife Anne has been a great help for the last 5 years and my daughter Donna is always at meetings to help and my loyal pit crew, James, Jay.

What sponsors would you like to thank?

I have never been lucky enough to have a sponsor but would like to thank Ian and Mike Hibberd for their help.

What were cars like when you first started racing?

Old classic stuff that was all good material for banger racing.

What was your best car?

So far it must have to be my last Nova, which served me for 5 years and won me a few races including the championship!

 

What is your favourite track?

Hednesford

What is your worst track?

Taunton

What is you ambition in stock rods?

I would like do as many of the main championships and maybe get a top 3 would be really nice. I would also like to end up with the respect and friendship of the other drivers!

 

 

 

By Jane Carter

 


 

 

Brian Smith’s story of his time in Stock Rods.

 

 

 

WHEN YOU START RACING?

I started Stock Rods in the Mid 70’s more a less when Stock Rods first ever started.

 

WHERE WAS YOUR FIRST RACE?

My first ever race in a Stock Rod was on the 8th April at Aldershot Stadium.

 

WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST CAR?

My first ever Stock Rod was a MG 1100cc

 

     
       

 

WHAT MADE YOU GET IN TO RACING?

Me and my mates one night ended up going to Wimbledon for something to do and see what motor racing was all about I also used to go with Russell (cousin) when he was a young boy who now machines for Stuart Smyth 447.  After going a few times I ended up racing a banger then ended up going into Stock Rods a few meeting after they started in the mid 70’s.

 

DID YOU BUILD YOUR OWN ENGINES?

My dad (Arthur) used to build my engines for me when I started Stock Rods up until 1990 when he passed away at a race meeting at Wimbledon Stadium, then I carried on following my dads foot steps building my own engines.

 

WHAT'S THE BEST MOMENT AND YOUR WORST MOMENT IN RACING?

My best ever moment in Stock Rods was winning the World Final at Ringwood in 1998, not because it was the world final it’s just the way I was not thinking I had a chance to win or I didn’t have a chance at all. My mind was just blank and just got on as it was a normal race meeting as I had been waiting for it for several years and never thought it would ever come.

 

My worst ever moment in stock rods was at Hednesford Raceway when I took flight over the winner’s ramp and come down nose first in August 2001 at the national weekend. I have also had other moments in stock rods but this was my final and worst crash.

 

 

       

                   

WHO DO YOU THINK MOST COMPETITIVE DRIVER?

I don’t think there is one competitive driver in Stock Rods the racing is so close that everyone is competitive to each other.

 

HAVE ALL YOUR FAMILY BEEN A GOOD SUPPORT TO YOU IN RACING?

 Yes all my family have been a good support at every race meeting I have done especially the wife putting up with all the time I spent down the garage.

  

WHAT SPONSORS WOULD YOU LIKE TO THANK?

ADR Engineering

George Polly Motorsport

Lyndale Race Engines

University Electrics

Yateley Commercials

 KB Recovery

 Simpson Race Exhausts

There is more but not that people would recognise and sorry if I have left anybody out.

 

WHAT WERE CARS LIKE WHEN YOU STARTED?

 The mean car when I first started was a fiat 124 which you would just put a roll cage in and race nothing like today with all these rules.

 

WHAT WAS YOUR BEST CAR? 

My best ever car was the Austin / MG which I won most of my championships in but I also liked my Nova as I won the World Final in it in 1998.

 

   

 

WHAT WAS YOUR FAVOURITE TRACK? 

My favourite track was Aldershot and any other track when it was wet.

 

WHAT WAS YOUR WORST TRACK?

My worst ever track was Rye House.

 

HAVE YOU MISSED RACING? 

I have not missed racing since I gave up in 2004 as I am still involved in the Motorsport with my son Daniel Smith in the Lighting Rods, Superstoxs.

 

WHAT TITLES DID YOU WIN?

 Over the years in Stock Rods I have won every Major Championships some of them more than once.

 

 
   

 

 

By Jane Carter

                                                                              Powered by Bravenet.com